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What fuel/brake SS hose?


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#21 Iain

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 12:46 PM

Can i ask what you use to connect the hose ends? I thought some kind of industrial press was required in order to get a seal that will not fail under pressure???


Standard compression fittings, in short you remove the outer coating (if present) slip the nut on, spred the outer braid, trip the inner tube, fit the oilve onto the tube put the main fitting body on then tighten the nut over the olive onto the fitting body which basically crimps the olive onto the inner tube.

the fittings you are talking about ar the once that come on supplied kits and are more of less the same thing but not threaded and are crimped into place.

Once thing i would say is dont built it if you can buy it, a pre made hose kit will be a good bit cheaper than anything that you make up at home as the end fittings are expensive (about £5/6 each) so a 6 line kit would have about £70 worth of fittings on it before you buy any hose.

Most of my internal brake lines are in cunifer pipe which is much much cheaper, like about £12 for a roll and the fittings are pence.

Braided lines are also a bit of a concern if your going to be welding on the car, as apparently you can get an arc in the braid, never actually seen it happen, but its not something that would be good to find out about on track.
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#22 Simonlpearce

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 02:31 PM

Standard compression fittings, in short you remove the outer coating (if present) slip the nut on, spred the outer braid, trip the inner tube, fit the oilve onto the tube put the main fitting body on then tighten the nut over the olive onto the fitting body which basically crimps the olive onto the inner tube.

the fittings you are talking about ar the once that come on supplied kits and are more of less the same thing but not threaded and are crimped into place.

Once thing i would say is dont built it if you can buy it, a pre made hose kit will be a good bit cheaper than anything that you make up at home as the end fittings are expensive (about £5/6 each) so a 6 line kit would have about £70 worth of fittings on it before you buy any hose.

Most of my internal brake lines are in cunifer pipe which is much much cheaper, like about £12 for a roll and the fittings are pence.

Braided lines are also a bit of a concern if your going to be welding on the car, as apparently you can get an arc in the braid, never actually seen it happen, but its not something that would be good to find out about on track.



Iain,

Sorry to bang on again about all this but i was under the impression that compression fittings, such as the ones you describe above, are not suitable for high pressure systems. So for braking systems they are a big no no? Where as for fuel systems etc then i think they are ok???

Again sorry to go on about it im just trying to get my head around all this so i dont go and cock up by fitting things wrong and end up putting myself or other track users at risk.



#23 Iain

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 03:39 PM

Iain,

Sorry to bang on again about all this but i was under the impression that compression fittings, such as the ones you describe above, are not suitable for high pressure systems. So for braking systems they are a big no no? Where as for fuel systems etc then i think they are ok???

Again sorry to go on about it im just trying to get my head around all this so i dont go and cock up by fitting things wrong and end up putting myself or other track users at risk.


well, they are the standard as supplied by goodridge, earls, venhill etc etc so i an pretty comfortable using them tbh. For example https://secure.demon...130cd5f1396e3ae is intended for dash 3 speedflex, which is a brake hose.

Rally design also sell compression fittings under brake line fittings http://www.rallydesi...Path=85_248_249
There will be no highlights on the eleven o'clock news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose. The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.

#24 Simonlpearce

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 04:17 PM

Cant argue with that, just wanted to be sure is all Posted Image

#25 saalro

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 06:42 PM

You can get fitments from such companies as:

http://www.ebay.co.u...rques_uk/m.html

http://www.goodridge...ies_-1_64_10551

I'm not sure if you can use these end fitments for brake lines though.

Thanks
Sam

#26 saalro

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 07:23 PM

-3 brake lines fittings too:

http://stores.ebay.c...d=p4634.c0.m322

So no industrial toosl needed.

Thanks
Sam

#27 Iain

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 10:35 PM

Don't know what car your looking to fit to dude but i don't think your going to be after AN fittings, they are American Navy standard which is fine for things like fuel and oil coolers but European and i would think jap fittings will be either m10x1 or m10x1.25 unless its very old, i which case you would be looking at uk imperial imo.
There will be no highlights on the eleven o'clock news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose. The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.

#28 saalro

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 11:14 PM

As far as i'm aware, the fuel lines running through my cabin are AN - 6, also refered to as 5/16 and 8mm. If i replace these i will be using a braided hose of this size.

Not all vehicle use the same sizing, so you do have to check the diameter of the hard line using a vernier gauge.

The hose connectors are labeled as such meaning they fit over AN - 6 braided hose, they use a olive compression ring to make a air tight seal that can hold "X" pressure, the thread however on the connectors will be either the OEM size to connect to the braking system or if connecting 2 braided hoses, or welding thread onto the fuel system components it won't matter as i'll be able to choose the size as i'll be making the braided hose.

If you look on the Goodridge site on on Torque UK eBay shop, and many other companies who sell hosing and connectors, you will see they use various measurements, mm, fractions and AN.

Thanks
Sam

#29 Iain

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 12:26 AM

Dude, i was just referring to brake line fittings as i wrote above " which is fine for things like fuel and oil" I don't think your going to get an AN fitting that matches up to an m10x1 standard brake fitting, you may get one that fits a dash 3 hose, but it wont be an AN standard as m10x1 aint an imperial measure. That is all :mellow:

Btw, if any of them are running outside the car i would personally avoid using an alloy fitting over a stainless braid, well unless you want to slap a load of duralac over the end of it i guess.
There will be no highlights on the eleven o'clock news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose. The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.

#30 saalro

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 10:02 AM

Slightly confused lol, i'll would just connect the brake line up to a braided hose by:

Hardline and your m10x1 type brake fitting.

http://www.austinhea...017-600x450.jpg

m10x1 braided hose fitting.

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item2311c706d0

AN - 3 braided hose.

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item27bc27fd8f

Thanks
Sam

#31 Iain

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 11:07 AM

Slightly confused lol, i'll would just connect the brake line up to a braided hose by:

Hardline and your m10x1 type brake fitting.

http://www.austinhea...017-600x450.jpg

m10x1 braided hose fitting.

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item2311c706d0

AN - 3 braided hose.

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item27bc27fd8f

Thanks
Sam


All looks fine mate, these fittings are a little cheaper and are swivel http://www.ebay.co.u...=item5637662f3f

Also, for me I would go with a coated braided hose rather than an exposed braid, stronger, shit doesn't get trapped in the braid, stops the braid rubbing through paint, wipe clean etc etc etc
There will be no highlights on the eleven o'clock news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose. The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.

#32 PhilMorrison

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 10:19 PM

Olive type fittings have a threaded cap that goes right over the braid, an olive that goes inbetween the outer braid and the teflon inner section, and the fitting itself pushes into the inner teflon. Then the threaded cap is screwed onto the fitting and it all clamps together around the olive. I have made loads of brake, fuel and boost lines like this and it's fiddly and hurts your fingers, but is reliable when done right.
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#33 tomslack34

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:38 AM

Hard lines are pretty good if not moved properly. Apart from that. they are cheaper as well but i guess braided is better. So,you should go for the braided ones.
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#34 saalro

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 10:19 PM

Standard compression fittings, in short you remove the outer coating (if present) slip the nut on, spred the outer braid, trip the inner tube, fit the oilve onto the tube put the main fitting body on then tighten the nut over the olive onto the fitting body which basically crimps the olive onto the inner tube.

the fittings you are talking about ar the once that come on supplied kits and are more of less the same thing but not threaded and are crimped into place.

Once thing i would say is dont built it if you can buy it, a pre made hose kit will be a good bit cheaper than anything that you make up at home as the end fittings are expensive (about £5/6 each) so a 6 line kit would have about £70 worth of fittings on it before you buy any hose.

Most of my internal brake lines are in cunifer pipe which is much much cheaper, like about £12 for a roll and the fittings are pence.

Braided lines are also a bit of a concern if your going to be welding on the car, as apparently you can get an arc in the braid, never actually seen it happen, but its not something that would be good to find out about on track.


What do you mean an arc in the braid?

In the end i found some SS braided hose on eBay that i was satisfied with and used various connectors and adaptors from Torques that use olive type compression seals.

I've had the car running and so far seem fine.

But i ask about the arc you mentioned as i recently had a cage put in and it would appear some bits of weld have landed on the SS braided hose and although i can not see any leaks, this arcs got me curious.

Thanks
Sam




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